Many Thanks To
Bob Dooley

England Football Online
Contact Us Page Last Updated 1 December 2014
 

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England's Uniforms

 

 

Goalkeeper Kits

First Choice Uniforms

  

England Goalkeeper Uniforms 1954 to 2014
The Umbro Years (part one)
1954-1961 Yellow
1954
Blue
1956
The Bukta Years
1959-1965
The Umbro Years (part two)
1965-1974
Yellow
1972
The Admiral Era
1974-1981
 
1981-1983
 
The Modern Umbro Era
1984-1986
1986-1988
1988-1989
1990-1991
1992-1993
1994-1995
1995-1997
1997-1999
1999-2001
2001-2005
2005-2006
2006-2009
2009-2011
2011-2013
The Nike Years
2013-2014
2014-2015
 

Notes (to be updated)

Prior to World War I, goalkeepers wore the same colours as their team mates, and were distinguished by donning a cap.  In modern times, England's goalkeepers have traditionally worn yellow jerseys, switching to a blue change jersey when facing yellow opposition.  Since 2001, the colour of the choice for the goalkeeper's shirt was switched from yellow to black, whilst keeping blue as the change colour.

The styles of the goalkeepers shirts generally reflect the style of the outfield players of the time, and these days, whenever a new outfield kit is launched, it is accompanied by a similarly styled goalkeepers shirt. So, for example, the stripes at the top of the chest in the early 1980's were also included in the goalkeeper's shirts, the large central badges of the mid to late 1990's were included on the goalkeeper's design, and more recently, the flag motifs on the shoulder have been part of the outfield and goalkeepers shirts, along with the running total of World Cup stars.

Any restraint shown to the outfield kit design by the fashion experimenters of the early 1990's was not shown when designing the goalkeepers shirts, resulting in some truly shocking designs. This culminated in a horrendous multi coloured red kit as donned by David Seaman during the semi-final of Euro 96, which was seemingly designed to dazzle opposing strikers to distraction. Goalkeepers shirts were also the first to display manufacturer's logos, the Umbro logo was included on the goalkeepers shirts of the early 1970s, years before it first appeared on the shirts of the outfield players.

Sometimes, when England wear an outfield kit which is neither white nor red, they will also wear a goalkeepers shirts which deviates from the traditional yellow and blue. So, for example, the yellow shirts worn during a few away matches in 1973 were accompanied by a green goalkeepers shirt. The 'Indigo Blue' (or grey) kit of 1996 was accompanied by the all-red kit mentioned above.

On a few occasions, mistakes are made and goalkeepers have to improvise with the kit they wear. Gordon Banks switched to a red shirt half way through their first game of the 1970 World Cup as his yellow shirt clashed with the Romanians.  Ray Clemence once wore a green adidas shirt for another game against [Romania].  Having a choice of only black or blue recently, Umbro have had to supply a yellow 'alternative' shirt for use when playing teams in dark blue, most recently in the 3-2 victory over Argentina in November 2005. - BD

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CG/BD/GI